massage

Allergy Relief Via Massage Therapy

by Krista Peterson, Marketing Outreach Coordinator, Longevity Wellness

Did you know that massage therapy can be a powerful tool in reducing those miserable allergy symptoms you experience every spring during the dreaded pollen season?

I’m sure lots of you here in Charleston and the Lowcountry area know all too well what I’m talking about. The struggle is real. Like, really real.

“But how is that possible, Longevity Wellness?” You may ask. Well, here’s the scoop. We’ll take you through a few different forms of therapy that can make a total difference in your overall well-being (and life) during this stuffy time of the year when everything is covered in a layer of yellow.

Facial cupping:

Facial cupping uses gentle suction of the skin to open pathways within the tissue and remove harmful toxins from your system (think, all of that icky stuff in your face causing pressure moving right on out). It works to relieve all sorts of conditions including: asthma, congestion, phlegm, sinus issues, excessive coughing and sneezing, and headaches. As an added bonus, it also regenerates cells providing youthful looking skin, minimizing wrinkles and uneven skin structure.

Fun fact: According to WebMD, cupping therapy “dates back to ancient Egyptian, Chinese, and Middle Eastern cultures. One of the oldest medical textbooks in the world, the Ebers Papyrus, describes how the ancient Egyptians used cupping therapy in 1,550 B.C.”

Body brushing:

To be honest, I didn’t know what body brushing was before I started working for Longevity Wellness. Boy, am I glad I found out. Body brushing stimulates the lymphatic system, which is responsible for keeping your cells healthy and strong. It boosts immunity, assists in detoxing, exfoliates the skin, increases energy, tones the skin, and reduces the appearance of cellulite. We’ll definitely be posting more blogs about it in the future because there is just so much to cover on how body brushing is seriously the best.

P.S. We sell body brushes, too!

Body cupping:

Cupping works to break up tough adhesions by pulling out toxins and scar tissue and bringing blood and lymph to the area that is being focused on. Benefits include increased mobility and range of motion, decreased pain, enhanced circulation, reduced inflammation, and lowered blood pressure. All of these benefits directly contribute to rinsing your body of allergies, moving the toxins out. Remember those big red circles on Michael Phelp’s back during the Olympics? Obviously, cupping is no joke and Olympic athletes know its power.

Elle.com

Elle.com

Personally, I can vouch that cupping is life-changing. My first experience with cupping was with my aunt, who is an amazing physical therapist and swears by it for her patients. I had been living with a crazy pressure point in my shoulder that caused so much exhaustion and pain for years. After an hour of her working on it with cupping, it was gone. After that, maintenance is key. I haven’t had the issue since, thanks to her and my team of therapists here in Mt. Pleasant at Longevity Wellness.

Here’s a picture of me right after I got my first cupping on my shoulder and my life was changed.

Here’s a picture of me right after I got my first cupping on my shoulder and my life was changed.

So, to review, if you are struggling with allergies, adding facial cupping, body brushing, and body cupping to your life can have profound benefits. Make sure to book your appointment with us at Longevity Wellness in Mt. Pleasant to elevate the experience of your usual massage. Plus, don’t forget to add some aromatherapy to your appointment for even MORE of a judo chop to those allergies. Say hello to wellness!

gift certificate, holiday specials, massage, sauna

4 REASONS WHY MASSAGE IS THE BEST HOLIDAY GIFT EVER

A massage gift certificate tucked into a holiday card may seem unassuming, but the effects of this present will be powerful.

People turn to massage for stress relief, pain alleviation and relaxation, and massage is appropriate for just about anyone—from healthy adults to seniors and pregnant women to athletes. Massage therapy is also safe and beneficial for people living with conditions including cancer, fibromyalgia and arthritis.

This is why treating the people on your gift list to massage makes sense this holiday season. Regular massage clients will know what to look forward to, and for someone who has never had a massage, a gift certificate can make his or her first session more accessible.

Here are four reasons why massage should be at the top of your holiday gift list, along with suggestions for massage and bodywork specialties to present to friends, colleagues and family:

1. The Gift of Stress Relief

The holidays can be filled with family, friends, fun, food—and freneticism. Gift-buying, overeating and travel can leave any merrymaker feeling tired and stressed. Massage makes the best holiday gift because it calms the nervous system and provides an oasis of respite from the holiday frenzy.

Three types of massage to gift:

  • Swedish massage: The most well-known type of massage, which utilizes strokes including stroking, kneading, percussion, vibration and friction.

  • Ayurvedic massage: This vigorous massage uses large amounts of warm oil and is one part of the traditional Indian detoxification and rejuvenation program.

  • Stone massage: Heated or cooled stones are placed on the body for energy balancing and a pampering sensation that contributes to the relaxation response.

 

2. The Gift of Pain Removal

From hanging Christmas lights to digging the Hanukkah candles out of the basement, the holidays’ decorating activities can create strain, sprain and pain. Massage makes the best holiday gift because it addresses pain and stiffness by increasing circulation, improving flexibility, and releasing crinkles and tight spots from muscles.

Three types of massage to gift:

  • Acupressure: An Asian therapy that involves pressing points along the body’s meridians with fingers, thumbs or palms of the hand to stimulate chi and bring about balance and health.

  • Sports massage: This session will feature techniques such as myofascial release, which affects connective tissue by applying pressure in the direction of fascial resistance.

  • Reflexology: A system that entails pressing points on the feet, hands or ears that correspond to systems and organs throughout the body.

 

3. The Gift of Raised Spirits

The holidays aren’t jolly all the time; family conflict, feelings of grief and other mood-stressors can arise, even in the midst of a Kwanzaa celebration. Massage makes the best holiday gift because it can boost mood. The release of the feel-good hormone, oxytocin, is increased during massage, as is the release of serotonin and dopamine.

Three types of massage to gift:

  • Craniosacral therapy: This light-touch modality uses gentle, soft-tissue techniques to release restrictions in the membranes around the brain and spinal cord.

  • Reiki: An energetic healing system that utilizes off-the-body hand placements to transmit healing energy from the practitioner to the recipient.

  • Geriatric massage: This session will feature massage techniques modified for safe application to older people, who might arrive at a session with issues related to joint pain or fragile skin.

 

4. The Gift of Ease

Give yourself the gift of a super-simple present purchase. Massage makes the best holiday gift because professional massage therapists offer gift certificates for sale, via in-person sales, a website or a Facebook page. Whether you purchase now or at the last minute, your gift of massage will be the easiest gift you give this holiday season—and the most appreciated.

Three types of massage to gift:

  • Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy: The Ashiatsu practitioner uses body weight and foot compression, while supported by overhead wooden bars, on a client who is lying down.

  • Pregnancy massage: This session will feature massage techniques modified for safe application to pregnant clients.

  • Facelift massage: This session might entail lymphatic-drainage strokes to firm sagging facial and neck skin, ease away facial lines, stimulate blood and oxygen, and release toxins. The treatment can also involve hot towel wraps and oils.

Virtually anyone on your list will appreciate the gift of massage therapy this holiday season.

Written: December 2, 2015

by:

massage

Making Your Massage Experience Even Better!

by Ryley Kennard

Hey all! It’s Ryley again! I just wanted to fill you in on a few exciting things happening around here. So, if you follow us on Facebook and Instagram, you may know that we recently were featured on News2’s Living Local segment.

Those that live near us, are familiar with News2’s Living Local segment. Ashleigh Messervy and her film crew came in and talked with our owners, Alana and Shelly, and spotlighted each of the services that we offer. Our entire team made it in the video too! Josh demonstrated stretch therapy on Elle, Angela showed off her Ashiatsu skills on Nick, Tarran sat in the sauna, and I got some facial cupping done by Alana! That was actually my first experience with cupping and it was so nice! It was very relaxing for me to take a break from the normal work day and have such a light, delicate service done. The whole experience of creating a video was fun to be apart of and for me to do with such a talented team.

If you want to see that spotlight, you can check it out on our new YouTube channel!

We recently launched a YouTube channel to feature full interviews with our staff, insider tips to making your massage experience EXCELLENT, corrective exercises/stretches to help increase mobility when you’re not near our office getting massaged or stretched, and other wellness related content. Those videos will be highlighted on our Facebook and Instagram pages as well!

Another new thing we’re trying out is posting our #lastminuteopenings on Twitter and Instagram. Sometimes we get last minute cancellations or someone’s schedule isn’t full, so we’ll be posting that days openings just in case you also have something change in your schedule and you’re near the area and available to come in!

And the last new thing we have coming… we’re updating our website! You may have noticed, our colors have changed already but we’re also getting a new layout ready to help make your booking experience easier. It’s near ready but there are a few adjustments that are being made still so if something has moved or is not working, feel free to let me know, but please understand that we are working to make improvements!

The very core of what we provide here at Longevity Wellness is healing. We want everyone to have a greater capacity to live their best lives and because stress is a real thing, and accidents happen, and sometime we go too hard, we want to provide you with tools and resources to solve those problems that keep you from your goals. Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel, and follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter so you don’t miss any of that content coming your way! We’re exciting for new ways to promote your healing and wellness and give moral support in reaching your goals!

Interview with Alana Long, Business Owner, Entrepreneur, & Mom

by Ryley Kennard

So, first of all, let me introduce myself. I'm Ryley Kennard, I'm the receptionist here at Longevity Wellness. I also run the social media pages. I got the chance to sit down with Longevity's owner, Alana Long, a few weeks back and got to know a little bit more about her history and experiences. It was a cool thing for me to do as an employee, to get to know my boss better and really understand what really drives her. It was really impressive to me how much she cares about the work that's she's doing. Wellness really is at the core of what Alana has created here at Longevity Wellness and she has worked really hard to provide tools and resources for others to incorporate a more balanced wellness routine in their life. See the full interview below:

Why did you decide to start your own business?

For a variety of reasons, really. But, when I became a massage therapist I was working for two other people. I did that for a couple years to get experience as a massage therapist and just to understand business and what not. I really felt like my goals and the vision that I had for what I wanted in a massage therapy business wasn’t really--there weren’t any out there. So I started my own business. I started just with myself and grew it into a larger practice. But what I really wanted to do when I did start Longevity, was create a business that was unique in the massage marketplace where it’s a team of therapists that are really, truly working together and they’re very skilled and professional. I wanted to create that environment where people were coming to us and knowing that no matter who they saw, they were getting the best experience possible, they were getting a highly trained staff, and that the staff worked really well together. So, if you saw one person or the next, that you would have an outstanding massage experience. And then another reason was, I just wanted to create flexibility--flexibility for myself. I’m a new mom so I’m able to work my schedule around what I need for childcare. Massage is a flexible industry anyways, but then having your own business is flexible too. So yeah, that’s kind of why I started it all.

How do you balance being a mom and owning a business?

Well, I’m still figuring it out. But, I do--I just take one day at a time. I try not to let things stress me out and if I’m having one bad day, I know that tomorrow it’s going to change and it’s going to be better. And obviously going home at the end of the day, even if it’s a very busy day, going home and seeing my baby’s smiling face definitely just, like, wipes away any negative feelings that I may have had throughout the day. But, I just take it one day at a time and I’ve learned through business and kind of like the way I approach life, is that everything is temporary, good or bad. So like, life is always changing and evolving and what not, too. So if I’m having a bad spell or whatever, I just know that, like, I just need to work hard, keep my head to it, and get through that. And at the same time, if things are really great or whatever, I don’t just sit and coast. I still continue to push on and work hard and do better because I know that also is temporary. So with anything, it’s just all temporary, don’t let things stress you out, and really just enjoy your baby or your kids, and that’s really the most important thing and then everything kind of fills around that.

When you look at prospective clients, who do you recommend comes to Longevity Wellness?

So I definitely would recommend somebody who’s looking for massage therapy to fix their issues. So if you want a skilled massage therapist, you want a professional massage therapist, you want to see somebody on a regular basis, then that’s who we are. I mean, we try to make it a relaxing environment in here and you know make it comfortable, but we’re not a spa. So if you’re looking for the spa experience, that’s not what we do here. We deal with people who have chronic pain or are really looking to fix what they have going on. So if you want somebody that's going to be more able to create a treatment plan for you, create--or like suggest--exercises or stretches, and give you like an entire experience and not just show up for one massage and go on your way then you would come here. Because we definitely address people’s issues and figure out what’s really going on with their body and then go from there.

How do you implement wellness in your daily life?

So I try to--I mean, the reason I got into massage therapy was because I was involved with sports and into wellness and even more so after I went into my massage career and then got my personal training certification, even more so. But I feel that I lead a pretty--I mean, always could have room for improvement--but an active and healthy lifestyle. Like, I’m always on the go. Me and my husband or the baby are always doing something active and I try to involve him in a lot of that kind of stuff. Eating right, I try to involve too. So I’m always doing a variety of things regardless of what it may be to help my wellness. So even if it’s just like a relaxation thing or an athletic thing or whatever I’m always trying to do something that’s like making me at peace.

What advice do you have for business owners?

So I definitely think that when--business is obviously difficult--but I feel that when people don’t succeed in business, it’s because they have quit before they figured out what works for them. And in everything in life too, I feel like you need to figure out the right way to do it. So if something’s not working for you, instead of giving up and saying ‘I can’t do this,’ you just have to figure out how to do things so that it does work for you. Cause I feel like a lot of times people, you know, even maybe for a period of years or just a few weeks or whatever, people quit before they figure it out the right way. So, I just think that if something's not working for you, don’t quit, continue to work and find what is the right path for you. Because if you are truly passionate about it, you will figure it out and you will make it work.
 

Your First Couple’s Massage

by bardw

A couple’s massage allows partners, spouses, mom’s and daughters, sons and dads, BFFs or anyone else to experience massage together in the same room as one therapist works with each person.  Couple’s massage is a shared bonding experience that can have many benefits beyond just the bodywork session.

What to expect

For many couple’s massage recipients it’s their first trip to see a massage therapist. You may have been invited by a someone who’s experienced at receiving a massage who wanted to share the experience. Or maybe it’s a special occasion?  Or maybe a “surprise” gift? The good news is that qualified and professional therapists are used to massage “newbies” and will ensure you are comfortable, give you all the information you ned to have a great session, and be open to answering any of your questions. Our first priority is maintaining guest comfort and protecting your modesty while making sure that the specific therapeutic needs of each client are met.

 

Typically, you should arrive 10-15 minutes before your session so that you can fill out some simple, but important paperwork.  This paperwork gives specific information to the therapist so they can tune the session to your needs.  The form will ask about any areas of your body that might be sore, tender or in pain, as well as areas you’d rather the therapist avoid. It will also ask about medical conditions relevant to massage therapy, and a few basic questions about your overall wellness.

During this time you can drink some water or use the restroom. You should also silence your cell phone for the duration of your session. If you’re interested in any extras, such as aromatherapy, for one or both of you, let the front desk know.

The main event

Once it’s time for your session to begin, the therapists will come and guide each of you to the therapy room.  They’ll go over the form and ask questions.  This is a GREAT time for YOU to ask questions too!  If your form indicates you’re a first-timer, the therapist will take extra care to make sure you know what to expect. Each therapist will then ready the room, then leave and allow each of you to undress to your comfort level.  Typically, for a full-body massage, this means underwear, but many long-time therapy recipients will completely undress.  There’s NO wrong way to do this, just be comfortable.  Once you’ve undressed, you’ll lay on the massage table under the sheets.  After a few minutes, your therapists will knock on the door, then return to the session room, adjusting your linens and often placing support under your feet or knees.

During the session you will be covered (draped) at all times, unveiling only the parts the therapist is working on, then recovering and moving on.  A skilled therapist is an expert draper and it’ll all seem completely comfortable while it’s happening.

The therapist will work intuitively to relax your muscles, explore trouble spots, and pay special attention to any areas you marked on your intake form.  Sometimes they will use oils, lotions, or creams to help make the bodywork more effective. Typically, these lubricants are hypoallergenic and scent-free, but sometimes they contain wonderful essential oils, like lavender, to enhance the experience.

About half way through the session, the therapist will coach you on how to turn over (still under the covers) and get ready for the next steps in your body work.

While most people are quiet during a session, but you should ALWAYS feel comfortable communicating with your therapist about things like pressure. Your therapist will probably check in once or twice to make sure you are comfortable.

The afterparty

At the end of the session, the therapist will signal you and both therapists will leave the room allowing you to carefully get off the table and redress.  Once dressed, open the door – that’s the universal sign that you’re ready to see the therapist again.  The therapists will talk to you a bit about the session and make any recommendations for further care, then escort you to reception for payment and rebooking.  You may leave a gratuity in the room (20% is common) or put it on the credit card when you check out.

It’s not unusual for you to feel super-relaxed after the session, so plan a bit of time to come out of your fog after you finish.  You can prolong that feeling by drinking lots of water and taking it easy for an hour or two. It’s totally OK to do something very active after massage, too, though, and you’ll likely find your flexibility and range of motion are better than ever as you run, hike, walk or play sports.

At the desk, you’ll have an opportunity to schedule additional sessions, find out about products that might be for sale, pay for your services.

So if you get a chance to participate in a couple’s massage session, don’t stress.  It is a wonderful, shared experience that you won’t forget.

massage

How Can I Find the Right Massage Therapist?

It is important to find a massage therapist with the skills you need.  Below are some easy steps you can take.

1. Identify your goals and health status

The first thing you should do is set goals for the massage session(s).  Are you interested in:

  • Reducing stress?
  • Reducing muscle contractions or tightness?
  • Living without chronic or acute pain?
  • Improving your work performance?
  • Enhancing your general health and wellbeing? 
  • Improving your ability to participate in sports?

Secondly, think about why you want to see a massage therapist:

  • Did a licensed medical professional such as physical therapist, medical doctor, or chiropractor suggest you try massage?
  • Are you managing any conditions your doctor is not aware of but hope that massage might alleviate?
  • Do you know someone who has many of the same aches and pains as you and who has benefited from receiving massage therapy?

Your answers to these questions will help you determine what skills you are looking for in a massage therapist.

2. Get some names

Many people are most comfortable getting a personal referral from a friend. Sometimes your friend can answer questions about the massage therapist and explain how they benefited from visiting this therapist.  

Another great source for referrals is your primary healthcare provider or a medical specialist. They may have a list of massage therapists that have specialized training and experience in techniques that are effective in treating your condition or complaint.

Other sources are professional associations, such as the American Massage Therapy Association  and the Associated Bodywork Massage Professionals . These sites generally check the qualifications of therapists listed.

You can also check out massage schools, local fitness/health clubs, spas, wellness centers, and chiropractic offices. 

Consumer should be cautious about selecting a massage therapist based solely on websites, listings in the yellow pages, local magazines, or newspapers. Most advertising venues do not screen for therapists who are self taught, running business illegally, or providing escort and sexual services. It will be up to you to do some homework.

3. Consider your personal preferences

You may want to include or eliminate potential therapists or styles based on personal preferences. For example:

  • Would you be most comfortable with a male or female therapist? 
  • Is location important? (If you plan to go once or twice a week, you may want to find a therapist close to work or home.)

4. Make a phone call to find out more about the therapist

If you don't already have this information, call and ask about:

  • Style or techniques used
  • Philosophy of care
  • Years in practice 
  • Specialty areas, experience with particular conditions (diabetesheart diseasepregnancy)
  • Training, advanced certification 
  • If the therapist belongs to professional organizations, and if so, which ones

You should look for a massage therapist who has at least 500 hours of training from a reputable, accredited school. (You can find out if a school is accredited by contacting the school directly.) 

If a therapist is nationally certified by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB), he or she has at least 500 hours of training from an accredited school and has passed a written exam. 

Another clue that the therapist is qualified is membership in a professional association that has established a certain level of professional preparation to join. These are the American Massage Therapy Association and the Associated Bodywork Massage Professionals .

If there is any doubt or apprehension on your part, it is always appropriate to clarify the style or techniques that the massage therapist uses and that the service you are booking is a non-sexual massage. 

5. Ask about costs and logistics

Ask about the fee. Specifically, ask:

  • What lengths of sessions are available and what is the fee for each. Typically, therapist will offer you a number of options, generally 30, 45, 60, 75 or 90 minutes. Ask if the rate is for hands-on time or if the intake is included in the time.
  • Are there different fees for different techniques?
  • Might your massage be covered by insurance?
  • Are there any additional fees or taxes?
  • Do they offer any special or discounted package rates?

Also ask about logistics:

  • How far in advance do you generally need to make an appointment?
  • What does the scheduled time mean-when you should arrive or when you should be ready to start the massage?
  • What is the cancellation policy? 
  • Do you need to bring clothes to better experience clinical therapies? For example, should you bring a bathing suit, gym shorts, or work out bra to wear during the massage? Should you bring clothes to change into afterward? 
  • Do they want to see a prescription from physician, exercise plan from physical therapy, or post surgical prescription?
  • What is the therapist's draping policy?
  • Finally, to arrive more relaxed, get clear directions and learn about parking options.

Expert Contributor: Beth Burgan, MA, MFA

Reviewed by: Dale Healey, DC

References

article link: https://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/explore-healing-practices/massage-therapy/how-can-i-find-right-massage-therapist

massage

The Health Benefits of Massage

By: Anita Brown via TripSavvy

We tend to think of massage as a way to pamper ourselves, but it's much more than a momentary feel-good treatment.  Massage therapy and massage spas have many important health benefits. In fact, massage can help you maintain physical, mental and emotional well being, especially when it is part of your regular wellness routine.

The work your massage therapist does in each session builds on itself, helping your body maintain its relaxed state and your muscles to remain pliable even during times of physical and mental stress.

Here are some of the many benefits of massage: 

* Massage calms the nervous system and promotes a sense of relaxation and well being.

* Massage reduces tension and anxiety, and can help relive depression.

* Massage improves blood circulation, which delivers oxygen and nutrients to the cells.

* Massage stimulates the lymphatic system, which carries away the body’s waste products.

* Massage prevents and relieve muscles cramps and spasms.

Massage therapy can help with pain management in conditions such as arthritis, sciatica, muscle spasms.

Remind yourself of these health benefits if you start to feel guilty about getting massage!

Massage is not a good idea if you have a fever, infections, inflammation, osteoporosis and other medical conditions.

If you have any questions about whether a massage would be right for you, ask to speak to a massage therapist before you make your appointment.

How often you should get a massage depends on several factors, including your physical and emotional needs; your stress levels; and your budget.  There's no question that you will experience the most health benefits from massage when you get massage regularly.

Massage therapy calms the nervous system, improves blood circulation and lymphatic circulation, relieves muscle pain, and helps with pain management in conditions such as arthritis, sciatica, muscle spasms.  

If you get a massage once a year, it will be relaxing, but it can't undo a lifetime of muscle tension. Typically, once every week or two is ideal for keeping your muscle tissue pliable and in good shape.   If you are in chronic pain or have a special issue to address, you might need to come weekly (or even twice a week) until you feel better.  

Once you're feeling good, once a month is the recommended minimum for maintaining the health of your tissue. If you start stretching the massages out too far apart, then your muscles can revert to their old patterns, especially if you come under stress.  If you wait too long, you'll have to start all over again to restore their suppleness and pliancy. Listen to your body, but don't wait too long in an effort to save money.

If you wait too long, you'll have to start all over again to restore their suppleness and pliancy. Listen to your body, but don't wait too long in an effort to save money.

massage

Incorporate Massage to Perform Better Athletically!

The daily stress of life wears our bodies’ down; we are subjected to mental stress, prolonged positioning, and hectic lives.   As an active society we add to that breakdown of the muscle and body systems by engaging in all different forms of exercise.  We run, skate, jump, ride, surf, kick, swing, throw, and climb.  We pick things up and put them down; heavy things.  We are constantly trying to improve our performance; to run harder, lift heavier, throw faster.  We push our bodies to its limit, planning intense work outs, each harder than the next.  But how much planning goes into our recovery from these workouts?  Not enough.  Proper attention needs to be taken to allow for rebuilding.  We can’t expect our bodies to perform at optimum levels under constant stress and tension without helping our muscles and joints on the back end with a proper recovery plan.  Massage is a key element in body recovery that will allow you to take your training to the next level.  Maintenance and pre, inter, and post event massage is crucial, not only for the professional competitor but also for the recreational athlete.

Massage focuses on increasing the blood circulation; lengthening muscles fibers to enhance the flexibility and Range of Motion (ROM).  We constantly hear about the importance of increasing ROM and how muscle restriction can reduce the ability of the joint to move through its correct degrees of movement.  The athlete with limited ankle or hip flexibility and improper ROM can negatively affect the other joints in the body.  The squat-one of the most common and beneficial exercises-is a perfect example of how limited ROM in the muscles and joints can impede on performance; the goal is to have the muscle contract and extend throughout the movements of an exercise stopping before the muscle is at its full length while allowing it to still have tension.  If the muscles are restricted, shortening the length of contraction and extension, full muscle activation will not be present.  Proper massage work is needed to elongate the muscle tissue freeing it from adhesions allowing the athlete to have proper body angles and achieve better results.

Massage helps to reduce Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).  Any athlete is familiar with DOMS; the two, three, possibly four day tenderness following a session that pains and prevents you from using your muscles for anything more than lifting a pencil.  Post-workout massage will help to reduce muscle tenderness to allow you to be back on the playing field or hitting the weights sooner than without.  This massage promotes rest and recovery by relaxing the muscle tissue, ridding the body of wastes, spreading the muscle fibers, and increasing blood flow. 

Proper planning and utilization of massage pre, inter, or post event will help not only with performance but with your recovery.  Flexibility can be enhanced by your therapist with passive and active stretching along with muscle work.  Maintenance massage encompasses the full picture of the athlete’s needs and emphasizes prevention.  Massage supports healthy tissue by addressing common muscular holding and tension patterns, spasm, adhesions, and trigger points.  A regular massage therapy program with a knowledgeable therapist can dramatically improve your results and help you break through plateaus that you may be experiencing.  No longer is massage thought to be a luxury to pamper oneself but instead for what it truly is and was established over 5000 years ago for: an essential component in healthcare.  Take care of your muscles and they will not only take care of you but allow you to do things physically that you never thought possible.  Healthy muscles, happy life.